Oxleaze Copse Crop Circle 21st May 2017

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Oxleaze Copse Crop Circle 21st May 2017

Reported to have been harvested, so limited pictures are available.   The following is a decode By Horace R Drew, Red Collie.

Both crop pictures from 2004 or 2017, near West Kennett Long Barrow or Oxleaze Copse, show the schematic image of a “solar eclipse”

and relate to real solar eclipses which lie 93 or 92 days respectively into their futures

A new crop picture at Oxleaze Copse on May 21, 2017 shows the “bright Sun” and “crescent Moon” symbols of a “solar eclipse” Furthermore, it closely resembles another “solar eclipse” crop picture which appeared near West Kennett Long Barrow on July 13, 2004

West Kennett Longbarrow, Wiltshire 13th Jul 2004
West Kennett Longbarrow, Wiltshire
13th Jul 2004

When we go back in time to find out which solar eclipse was predicted by that 2004 crop picture, we find a 93% partial solar eclipse on October 14, just 93 days later, as shown in the upper part of a slide below:

Then when we go forward in time to find out which solar eclipse might be predicted by the 2017 crop picture, we find a 100% total eclipse on August 21, just 92 days later, as shown in a lower part of the slide above.

In summary, both crop pictures from 2004 or 2017 (i) look similar in appearance, (ii) seem to describe the same kind of astronomical event (a “solar eclipse”), and (iii) were drawn at almost the same interval of time before a near-future solar eclipse took place (93 or 92 days respectively).

Their 2004 crop picture suggests a Mayan calendar with 18 months per year, known as the “Tzolkin”

What kind of “calendar” might have been drawn within each of those two crop pictures, by which we could specify the date of a solar eclipse? Their 2004 crop picture suggests a Mayan-Aztec calendar with 18 months per year, known as the “Tzolkin”:

Very few (if any) calendars on Earth today include 18 units of time for either “months” or days”. The Metonic cycle of our Moon takes 18.6 years as another possibility.

Their 2017 crop picture suggests a lunar calendar with 12 months per year, based either on new and full “phases”, or North and South “nodes”

By contrast, their 2017 crop picture suggests some kind of lunar calendar with 12 months per year. Two different kinds of lunar calendar are possible here: one in which the visible lunar phases switch from new-to-full-to-new, once every 29.5 days; or another in which our Moon passes through unseen lunar nodes as North-to-South-to-North, once every 27.2 days. Each of these two possibilities would be consistent with images shown in the slide below:

One set of “12 bars” was drawn within and around the large outer ring of this new crop picture, while another set of 12 bars was drawn within and around its small inner ring. Each set of 12 bars may represent the 12 times that our Moon goes from new-to-full-to-new, or else passes North-to-South-to-North through its nodes, during any lunar “phase year” or “eclipse year” respectively. Those two sets of bars were drawn offset in angle from one another, perhaps to suggest that our Moon passes alternatively through a North node, then a South node, then another North node, and so on

The term “draconic month” came from an ancient belief that some “dragon”, who lives in the night sky, would “eat” or “swallow” our Sun or Moon during a solar or lunar eclipse

Our Moon passes through the same North or South node, in its orbit around the Earth, once every 27.212 days. This is referred to as a “draconic” month, because ancient people imagined that a “serpent” or “dragon” lived in those night-sky nodes. Such a mythical “dragon” would supposedly “eat” or “swallow” our Sun or Moon during any eclipse, so as to block their light!

Just above this new “eclipse” crop picture in the landscape, we can see the schematic image of a “serpent” or “dragon” which has its “mouth open”, and seems ready to metaphorically “eat” an “eclipsed Sun” which was drawn in crops below (as indicated by a white dashed line):

Several “bar” shapes in the landscape, located just below that “serpent” or “dragon”, may have inspired the crop artist to draw “bar” shapes in his new crop picture, as two sets of 12.

We can also see a large “rabbit” shape in landscape nearby, looking at his “astronomical clock”

When we study landscape features which lie further away from this new crop picture, using Google Earth (at latitude 51.417o N, longitude 1.673o W), we can also see a large “rabbit” shape in the landscape, not far away on the right:

This “rabbit” seems to be “looking carefully” at the new crop picture which was drawn to his lower left, just as a “White Rabbit” from “Alice in Wonderful” might look at his pocket watch:

“Oh dear! Oh dear! I shall be too late!”

Might this clever choice of landscape be an intentional joke by the crop artists? And will a “white rabbit” carefully watch his “astronomical clock” on August 21, 2017 when the next total solar eclipse takes place?

We also saw a distinctive “rabbit” shape in the landscape near a crop picture at Chilcomb Ranges on August 3, 2016 (see chilcomb ranges articles).

Most crop pictures in April or May of 2017 have shown images of “lunar crescents” or “clocks”

The “eclipse” image which was drawn in crops at Oxleaze Copse on May 21 was not unexpected for this 2017 crop-circle season. Indeed, most crop pictures in April or May of 2017 have shown the schematic images of “lunar crescents” or “clocks”:

 

 

Many thanks to Mark Fussell

Sources

Cropcircleconnector

Lucy Pringle 

 

 

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